Feature

Seoul to showcase ground-breaking SunLike at LuxLive

SunLike Series LEDs have the potential to drive a revolution in lighting – overcoming the limits of artificial light sources by implementing light closer to the natural spectrum of sunlight.

SEOUL SEMICONDUCTOR, the global leader and innovator of LED products and technology, will demonstrate its Lux Award-winning SunLike Series LEDs at next month’s LuxLive 2019 exhibition at London ExCeL.

SunLike Series LEDs are the world’s first natural spectrum LEDs, producing light that closely matches the spectrum of natural sunlight.

The new LED technology is generating interest from lighting companies across the globe, many of whom are developing lighting products using the platform.

Interest is growing in human-centric lighting sources, with new research studying the effects of light on human biorhythms, as evidenced by the recent Nobel Prize in Physiology to scientists who discovered the internal mechanism that controls human circadian rhythms.

‘Because the SunLike Series LEDs are designed to deliver light that closely matches sunlight’s natural spectrum, they provide an optimised light source that maximises the benefits of natural light,’ says Yo Cho, director of Seoul Semiconductor’s Lighting Divison. ‘Thus, the colours and texture of objects can be viewed more accurately, as they would be seen under natural sunlight.’

According to Dr. Kibum Nam, head of Seoul’s R&D Centre and chief technology officer, ’SunLike Series LEDs have the potential to drive a revolution in lighting – overcoming the limits of artificial light sources by implementing light closer to the natural spectrum of sunlight.

‘Seoul is opening a whole new era of natural spectrum lighting with the launch of SunLike LED technology.’

SunLike Series natural spectrum LEDs may also play a key role in minimising the negative effects of artificial lighting.

While conventional LED technology produces light with a pronounced blue spike in its spectral output, SunLike LEDs implement a more uniform spectrum that more closely matches natural sunlight, lowering this blue light spike.

While conventional LED technology, right, produces light with a pronounced blue spike in its spectral output, SunLike LEDs, left, implement a more uniform spectrum that more closely matches natural sunlight, lowering this blue light spike.

Some recent research indicates that this blue light spike may produce negative effects when viewed for prolonged periods of time during night-time hours, potentially interfering with natural human biorhythms.

By employing new light sources powered by SunLike Series LEDs, lighting designers will be able to deliver a healthier light experience.

Interest in the link between light sources and human health is higher than ever before, as evidenced by the winners of this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology, Professor Jeffrey C. Hall, University of Maine; Professor Michael Morris Rosbach, Brandeis University; and Professor Michael Young, Rockefeller University.

These researchers are credited with seminal discoveries about the cellular mechanisms for circadian biology.

Seoul Semiconductor says SunLike’s positive properties were also confirmed in a recent study by Dr Octavio L. Perez, adjunct researcher in integrative lighting at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

The study looked at the non-visual effects of light on the body, and found that the SunLike Series LEDs provide up to 21 per cent more ‘circadian stimulus’ than conventional LEDs at a colour temperature of 4000K, and the same stimulus as daylight at 6500K.

Another study by scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland found that LED lights with a spectrum close to sunlight could have a very different effect on human circadian rhythms to conventional LEDs, with beneficial effects on health and wellbeing.

Professor Christian Cajochen and his team found that people who spent time under LED lights with a spectrum close to sunlight were more comfortable, more alert, had better moods and slept better, compared to those who spent time under conventional LED lights.

 

  • See the SunLike technology on the Seoul Semiconductor stand G20 at the LuxLive 2019 exhibition, taking place at London ExCeL on Wednesday 13 November and Thursday 14 November 2019. Entry is free. For more information and to register, click HERE.