Feature

Luminaire supplier launches industry’s first buy-back plan

Reclaimed luminaire specialist skinflint has now announced that it will pay a significant residual-value fee to take back the products when the projects get refurbished and they are no longer needed.

A UK lighting supplier of reclaimed luminaires has introduced a buy-back service in which it will purchase its products back from the client at the end of use.

‘To us, reclaiming a vintage light means keeping the essence of the original light fitting intact, but that you can rely on it to work perfectly, and safely, every day’, says skinflint director Chris Miller

Cornwall-based skinflint supplies bars, restaurants, hotels, workplaces and private homes all over the world with light fittings.

In recent years, pre-used industrial high bays, pendants and wall lights have become highly fashionable for their ‘retro’ over-engineered appeal.

The company sources them from derelict factories across Europe, refurbishes them and tests them for electrical safety before putting them back on the market.

It has now announced that it will pay a significant residual-value fee to take back the products when the projects get refurbished and they are no longer needed.

‘The work we do at skinflint is based on respecting and preserving the heritage of each piece,’ says company co-founder Chris Miller. ‘We have three guiding principles: To salvage the best lighting from the 1920s to the 1970s, to restore every piece sensitively – without compromising its character and to refurbish each fixture to the highest modern standards.

‘We don’t want to see them end up in a skip after five or ten years’.

Miller believes that his company can set an example of the circular economy – in which products and materials are re-used –  in the lighting industry.

‘To us, reclaiming a vintage light means keeping the essence of the original light fitting intact, but that you can rely on it to work perfectly, and safely, every day.

‘So we restore and use as many of the original components, except the bulb holders, wiring and suspension chains, as we can – and we often preserve the visible signs of age that hint at the light’s first story: where, when and how it was originally made and used.

‘So we’re always searching for disused lighting with a classic, industrial quality.

‘Often, we find lights on sourcing trips to former Eastern Bloc countries, but we also keep a watch for redevelopments and demolitions closer to home.

‘We gained access to the former Pirelli warehouse and the Cockenzie Power Station, for example, meaning we could salvage dozens of vintage lights that might otherwise have been lost.’

 

  • A major conference on Lighting’s role in the circular economy will take place in the Crystal building at Royal Victoria Docks in London on Tuesday 24 March 2020. Organised by the waste electrical and electronic equipment compliance body Recolight and chaired by Ray Molony, the event aims to shape the industry’s move to a low-waste model. More information HERE.