IoT/Smart Lighting, Retail

M&S introduces cloud-based lighting control

M&S store with IoT lights
The deployment at Marks & Spencer is understood to be a trial installation of a new multisite version of Signify’s Interact Retail system.

UK RETAILER Marks & Spencer is using a cloud-based lighting control system across a number of its stores.

The deployment is understood to be a trial installation of a new multisite version of Signify’s Interact Retail system.

The platform – which has already 2,000 installations in stores across the world –  allows retailers to reduce energy consumption by defining scenes and schedules on store level. 

The multisite version makes it possible to create a network of connected stores. So for instance the retailer can create and manage uniform light schedules for its stores from a single dashboard, to reduce its operational costs, ensure compliance and to plan maintenance.

The system allows for individual control of zones in the store using any internet-connected device

‘Compared to sites with conventional lighting controls, the new system enables us to be much more responsive,’ Alan Chisholm, head of standards and innovation, property and store development at M&S, told Lux.

‘We can now adapt the light settings within the same day and deploy this to any number of stores connected to the Interact Retail multisite system. 

‘This will help us to reduce our operational expenses and meet our sustainability targets’.

Facility managers can use the multisite IoT-based system to monitor energy consumption across the stores, as well as optimise the light settings. 

Sensors can enable daylight harvesting and trigger the right light behaviour based on presence.

Users can also define automated schedules, for example lowering the light levels during the day when restocking and cleaning, or during winter when the shorter days allow for different light levels. 

On days when energy prices surge, the energy manager can react within the hour by implementing a modified lighting schedule that mitigates peak tariffs.

Lighting scenes and schedules can be scheduled from the single dashboard. 

Additionally, store maintenance teams can use a preventive approach instead of a reactive one, giving insights into current faults and flagging potential future defects before they occur in order to limit downtime and return visits. 

Facility managers can use the multisite IoT-based system to monitor energy consumption across the stores, as well as optimise the light settings. 

In November, Signify announced that it was creating bespoke luminaires for M&S by 3D printing them to order.

It printed spotlights for the retailer using shredded recycled material at Signify’s factory at Maarheeze in the Netherlands.

Signify described the move is a major step towards the so-called ‘circular economy’ in which waste is eliminated and materials are continually re-used.

The light fittings for the Marks & Spencer store roll-out – believed to run into thousands – are being made at Signify’s first 3D printing factory in the Netherlands, but it plans to establish additional 3D printing facilities in the US, India and Indonesia.