IoT/Smart Lighting, Outdoor, Street

Street lights monitor air quality and footfall in Lincolnshire

LED street lights in South Kestevan, Lincolnshire
Data collected by the lights is streamed in real time to a control dashboard via the cloud, allowing the local council to make informed decisions based on real-time data as well as controlling the output of the lights.

A SET OF LED streets in rural Lincolnshire will monitor air quality and footfall in a pilot installation funded by the Government.

In the project, 12 street light heads will collect data on their surroundings: four on a public footpath in Grantham; four at Stamford bus station; and four at Cattle Market car park in Stamford. 

They are loaded with smart technology, offering sensor control and dimming, with some of the lights also providing air quality and video monitoring.

Data collected by the lights is streamed in real time to a control dashboard via the cloud, allowing the local council to make informed decisions based on real-time data as well as controlling the output of the lights.

Scottish technology company arbnco is installing the lighting in partnership with South Kesteven District Council. 

The pilot will help the Council reduce its energy consumption, and support its ambition to reduce its carbon footprint by 30 per cent before 2030. It is expected to deliver energy savings of at least 60 per cent.

The project forms part of the IoT for Local Authorities programme run by Digital Catapult, the UK’s advanced digital technology innovation centre. 

The programme aims to help local authorities harness the potential of IoT by collaborating with start-up and scale-up technology companies.

 The LEDs will generate a minimum of 60 per cent reduction in energy cost for the Council during the trial period compared to the metal halide lamps previously used. 

They have a high Colour Rendering Index (CRI) of 95, bringing a new level of safety to drivers, cyclists and pedestrians.

All 12 street lights are fitted with timing and dimming controls to reduce their energy consumption through the night. 

The lights along the footpath also have a built-in camera, allowing the dimming to be controlled via motion-detection. 

At night, these lights will be reduced from 70W to 5W to reduce wastage, and will brighten again when they detect movement. 

The video monitoring also enables the Council to monitor footfall and direction of travel along the path.

In addition to the enhanced controls, the lights at the bus station are also fitted with sensors to monitor air quality, helping the Council to reduce pollution levels. 

Sensors on the lights will monitor temperature, humidity, and pressure, as well as compounds that can be particularly harmful to humans, such as sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and fine particulate matter. 

This will allow South Kesteven District Council to understand air quality in the area, how it might affect residents, and take measures to improve it.

‘We’re continually looking for new ways to reduce our carbon footprint and save money and this is a great example of using the latest technologies to do both. South Kesteven Councillor Dr Peter Moseley, cabinet member for commercial and operations, told Lux.

‘IoT technology is playing an increasingly important role in local government, and offers the opportunity to remotely control and monitor the condition of equipment, and make the best use of resources.’

Arbnco won the pilot contract after a competitive process which saw thirteen organisations pitch.