Circadian Lighting, Healthcare

‘Dementia room’ features dynamic white LED lights

Two side-by-side pictures of a care home with warm white and cool white lighting
At the Fynsgade Nursing Home in Grindsted, Denmark, an automatic control system tunes the white LED lighting to vary the colour temperature of the light throughout the day.

A SO-CALLED ‘dementia room’ for elderly patients featuring dynamic circadian lighting has been unveiled at a care home. 

At the Fynsgade Nursing Home in Grindsted, Denmark, an automatic control system tunes the white LED lighting to vary the colour temperature of the light  throughout the day.

It varies the scenarios from warm (2700K) to cold light (6500K) following the rhythm of the day for both the temperature of the colour and the intensity of light. 

The staff have the option of absolute control on the light in the evening and at night, should something urgent or emergency occur. 

The sophisticated lighting system is also installed in the corridors, living rooms and common areas. 

The concept is to provide ‘calming and stimulating’ light help both the staff and residents to have a better everyday life. 

Kathrin Terkelsen, manager of the Fynsgade Nursing Home, told Lux the specification of the lighting followed research into the effects of light.

‘We have studied many articles on light and AV systems to help dementia patients’.

She says the dementia room works even better than she expected. 

The equipment was supplied by Danish human centric lighting pioneer Lightcare.

The workhorse of the installation is the Avi-Care luminaire which both recessed into ceilings and surfaced mounted.

The dynamic light was also installed in the Snoezelen multi-sensory room.

Snoezelen is a manufacturer of special relaxing environments which help reduce agitation and anxiety while also engaging and delighting the occupants, stimulating reactions and encouraging communication. The rooms are popular in care homes. 

As well as assisting patients living with dementia, Terkelsen says that the addition of calming and health-promoting lighting can also counter anxiety and Seasonal Affective Disorder by mimicking light simulations which normally only occur outside in the sunlight.

The installation and assembly was carried out by local electrical contractor Finn Lauridsen.

It’s also reported that the dynamic lighting can calm very aggressive and agitated people with dementia, and possibly reduce the cost of medicine and allow the staff to spend more time with other patients. 

Anecdotal evidence suggests that at Fynsgade Nursing Home, sad or shy patients with dementia can become happier and more energetic.