Lighting Industry

Meet the world’s first carbon neutral lighting maker

A man in a suit giving a speech
‘I’m extremely proud of all the Signify employees and thank them for supporting our carbon neutrality objective’, said Signify CEO Eric Rondolat.Credit: Ray Molony

SIGNIFY has become the world’s first major lighting manufacturer to become carbon neutral. 

The Dutch giant, formerly Philips Lighting, has achieved carbon neutrality for all its operations across the world as well as using 100 per cent renewable electricity

Signify has reduced its operational emissions by more than 70 per cent since 2010, having shifted to more energy-efficient technologies at its sites, to more sustainable modes of transport and logistics planning, and to less travel. 

It also uses 100 per cent renewable electricity, supported through two power purchase agreements, one in Texas and a second in Poland. 

The balance of emission reductions is achieved through a carbon offsetting programme with projects aimed at benefiting the wellbeing of local communities.

Additionally the firm says it’s committed to responsible consumption and production with luminaires that can be reprinted, refurbished, reused or recycled. 

It has set a goal of doubling its revenues from circular products, systems and services to 32 per cent in 2025. 

This includes revenues from 3D printed luminaires and from streetlights with reusable components and recyclable parts that were introduced earlier this year.

Signify sees 3D printing as a major component in the so-called ‘circular economy’ in which waste is eliminated and materials are continually re-used.

A typical manufactured luminaire, excluding electronics and optics, has a 47 per cent lower carbon footprint than a conventionally manufactured metal luminaire.

3D printing of a luminaire
Signify sees 3D printing as a major component in the so-called ‘circular economy’ in which waste is eliminated and materials are continually re-used.

The company  is already shipping bespoke luminaires to customers by 3D printing them to order. Its first major customer was the UK retailer Marks & Spencer. 

The company says it has perfected this form of manufacturing, using a 100 per cent recyclable polycarbonate material, which allows luminaires to be bespoke designed or tailored to customer’s needs and recycled at the end of their life.

‘I’m extremely proud of all the Signify employees and thank them for supporting our carbon neutrality objective’, said Signify CEO Eric Rondolat.

“It’s a truly significant achievement for us and we call on many others to join us.’

Cooper Lighting, which Signify acquired in 2019, is not yet included in the company’s neutrality but chiefs say it will be by 2022.