Healthcare, Transport

St Pancras deploys UV-C robots to reassure rail passengers

A robot with blue light on a railway concourse
St. Pancras International says the cleaning robots will help eradicate viruses throughout the station’s concourse and facilities and reassure rail passengers that the facility is safe to use.

ST PANCRAS International in London has become the first train station in the world to deploy UV-C lighting robots in the fight against coronavirus. 

It says the cleaning robots will help eradicate viruses throughout the station’s concourse and facilities and reassure rail passengers that the facility is safe to use. 

The ultraviolet robot, from Danish manufacturer UVD Robots, was originally initially designed to significantly reduce the risk of hospital acquired infections.

Now it will be doing the rounds throughout one of the UK’s busiest railway station, in conjunction with an ultrasonic disinfection atomiser cleaning robot, known as an Eco Bot 50.

To coincide with  the reopening of the station’s stores and cafés in June, the building’s managers introcuced a number of heightened hygiene measures.
The introduction of UV-C robot is seen as an extra layer of protection for Londoners and commuters.

UVD Robots describes the technology as ‘a new and powerful weapon against the spread of the coronavirus’.

With ultraviolet light, the robot can disinfect and kill viruses and bacteria autonomously, effectively limiting the spread of coronaviruses without exposing hospital staff to the risk of infection.

The robot’s lamps can kill 99 per cent of viruses and bacteria including Covid-19 on all surfaces and in the air surrounding it in a matter of minutes.

Alongside this, the Eco Bot 50 cleans and disinfects surfaces simultaneously with an automated scrubber dryer. 

The robot’s function to auto-charge, drain and refill means minimal human interaction is needed and it is able to provide thorough and consistent cleaning 24/7.

In August, Heathrow Airport introduced self-driving UV-C robots to patrol the gates, toilets, waiting zones and other  areas when they are unoccupied and disinfect the rooms, handrails, handles and furniture.

A unit is deployed in both of Terminal 2 and Terminal 5. Each has a network of sensors to detect if human beings are nearby, in which case the UV-C lamps with switch off. 

Claus Risager, CEO of parent company Blue Ocean Robotics and chairman of the board of UVD Robots, said: ‘We’re now helping solve one of the biggest problems of our time, preventing the spread of bacteria and viruses with a robot that saves lives in hospitals every day.’

The concentrated UV-C light emitted by the robots as they drive has a germicidal effect that removes virtually all airborne viruses and bacteria on the surfaces of a room. Results, that led to the UVD robot winning the robotics industry’s ‘Oscar’ – IERA Award in 2019.

UVD Robots worked with Odense University Hospital in Denmark and other hospitals in Denmark to develop the first prototype of the UV-disinfection robot, with the objective of preventing Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) for the benefit of patients, hospital staff and associated healthcare costs.