Feature

Police install lighting to circular economy principles

Police cars and vans in a warehouse
Chiefs at Cheshire Police Authority chose to reuse and upgrade many of the existing fittings at its headquarters instead of simply replacing them.

ONE OF the UK’s first lighting installations to circular economy principles has been commissioned by the police. 

Chiefs at Cheshire Police Authority chose to reuse and upgrade many of the existing fittings at its headquarters instead of simply replacing them. 

BAM FM, the facilities managers of the building, recognised a need to update the building’s 15 year-old internal lighting system as a significant number of the old light fittings were starting to need replacing, and the lighting’s control system could only be maintained by rewiring each fitting. 

Maintaining the current lighting system would cause ongoing and significant disruption to the authority, so instead it was proposed to upgrade their lighting, in a solution that reused many of the existing fittings and also enabled increased functionality, efficiency and a healthier work environment. 

Having previously participated in BAM’s circular economy workshops, the supplier, Whitecroft Lighting, was able to offer brand new lighting with increased efficiency and enhanced control, and take three of the original fittings back to the factory and explore the opportunity for reuse.

Whitecroft says the police job is its first circular economy project and it delivers significant cost and material savings.

‘We worked collaboratively with BAM FM and [electrical contractor] Gibson & Ryan to determine the best solution to both improve the lighting efficiency and reuse as much material as possible’. 

The company transported 120 Cirrus light fittings back to its factory and upgraded them to LED. 

Whitecroft transported 120 Cirrus light fittings back to its factory and upgraded them to LED. Each light now uses 23W less energy than its predecessor.

It was possible to reuse the luminaire body, louvre and flying leads. 

The retrofitted luminaire provided the required level of efficiency and it was £30 cheaper to manufacture compared to new light fittings. 

Additionally, Whitecroft upgraded 75 stairwell fittings from fluorescent tubes to LED onsite in order to keep the stairwells in operation, provided 1,300 bespoke bazel units to install more efficient downlights in the existing ceiling and modified 82 control modules to upgrade the corridor lighting functionality. 

A new wireless control system from Organic Response was also installed, which drastically reduced the need for new cabling and also increased functionality with real-time monitoring, emergency testing and daylight dimming. 

‘This project was a great success, and demonstrates the advantages of long-term, collaborative relationships with our supply chain to drive innovation,’ Julia Messenger of BAM Construct UK told Lux.

The project value was £34 million. Whitecroft estimates that 2,000 kilograms of material was saved compared to installed new lights. Each light now uses 23W less energy than its predecessor.