Circadian Lighting, Industrial

Circadian lighting ‘keeps power station managers alert’

A power station control room bathed in red light
The installation at the Skærbæk power station includes custom-built luminaires, automatic circadian lighting and the possibility of creating optimal lighting conditions based on 16.8 million colour combinations.

HOW SHOULD a modern control room be designed to take account of the working environment of the on duty engineers?

This question was the starting point when chief engineer Jens Kudsk Vejrup was entrusted with the task of upgrading the control room at Skærbæk power station in Denmark.

Built in 1951, the facility originally used coal as fuel but was converted to gas in 1997 and to wood chips in 2014. 

The wood chips are sourced from sustainable forestry and help to reduce the plant’s carbon emissions.

The circadian lighting in the new control room has been supplied by Danish firm Lightcare, which has developed and designed a special solution tailored to Skærbæk.

The installation includes custom-built luminaires, automatic circadian lighting and the possibility of creating optimal lighting conditions based on 16.8 million colour combinations.

‘There is now a lot of research and empirical evidence that can help improve the working environment through new lighting technologies, where you can create changing lighting, lighting temperatures and colours throughout the day, and you have the possibility of a completely individual lighting for the individual on duty employee in the control room,’ said a spokesman for the company.

‘The blue colours have a big influence on circadian rhythm and sleep, and with the system, for example, you can remove the blue colours from the light and instead get warmer colours if you wish. 

‘Each time a new team comes on duty, they can create their own lighting, which can be pre-programmed, so they quickly get their own lighting with a few clicks.’

‘We now have a screen that is dedicated to the lighting in both the control room and the rest of the power plant, so that all lighting can be controlled from here, where you should go to controlboard before,’ says Jens Kudsk Vejrup, who was originally trained as an electrician and worked as a CTS technician before becoming a mechanical engineer.

Lightcare supplies customers in healthcare, pharmaceutical and industrial sectors.

Common to all is that the working environment is improved with optimised production and higher satisfaction and well-being for the staff, says the company.

Full-dynamic circadian lighting ‘helps to increase quality in the working environment, increase satisfaction, energy level and attention’.